ExpoCoverage , Parts

2012 Shimano XT and XTR

Shimano revamped their Deore XT line, and the new M780 group got a slew of trickled down technology from the 2011 XTR brethren, and come in a more affordable price point. The XT gets an 2×10 (40/28 and 38/26) and 3×10 (42-32-24) crankset, Race and Trail pedals, Race and Trail wheelsets, index shifting with multiple release and vivid indexing, Servo-Wave brakes with a two-piece caliper that has the ICE technology (radiator-backed pads, alloy-core rotors, 22mm oversized pistons). This goes along with the 2011 M770 wide-range 10-speed cassette and asymmetrical chain. The system will be available in silver or black.

For 2012 XTR gets a new rear derailer, dubbed the Shadow Plus (RD-M985). It has a heavier spring and a gold colored two positions ratcheting switch (On or Off), which they call the stabilizer. The system consists of spring with a one way friction pivot or ratchet gear, which is enclosed by a band clamp. The Off position moves the clamp upward away from the pivot, allowing free cage movement, and when the clamp is down, it tightens the pivot up, constricting movement or increasing friction in the forward direction. When engaged, this increased pivot friction, dampens the cage,  quiets down chain noise, decreases chain slap, and helps alleviate any chain drop offs. When the switch is Off, the derailer acts like a standard Shadow, and this mode makes for easier wheel removal and drivetrain fine tuning. I played with this at the show, and it makes a dramatic difference, and will make flying through rough terrain and rock gardens much more enjoyable.


Additional Product Pricing:
Pedals (PD-M780 and PD-M785): $149.99
Wheels (WH-M785 and WH-M788): $749.99



NOTE: There are two ways to comment on our articles: Facebook or Wordpress. Facebook uses your real name and can be posted on your wall while Wordpress uses our login system. Feel free to use either one.

Facebook Comments:



Wordpress Comments:

  • Francois says:

    I got the chance to ride the XTR Shadow Plus derailleur. This is the one with anti-chain slap technology. Basically, the derailleur spring is realllly stiff and it prevents the chain from slapping around when descending a rocky downhill. You know how we all get on the big front ring to prevent this?

    Well it works. I didn’t hear the chain hit at all while descending the trails at Sea Otter. To take off the wheel, you can flip a lever on the derailleur to get it to normal spring tension and you get the derailleur out of the way easily.

    My only question is whether this ‘high-tension’ mode increases the drag on the drivetrain. On a singlespeed for example, there is hardly any drag on the drivetrain since there is no deralleur spring tensioning the chain. Does it put the chain at a higher tension? Or is it the same but it gets tighter from that point. Hmmm..

  • Brian Mullin says:

    Francois: good question, I’ll see if I can get a response from the mothership on that one! I am regularly riding around in the granny gear, and when I drop down the short techy rock gardens, the chain slap is pretty annoying.

  • nate k says:

    so would an XTR plus make a 1×10 drivetrain run well without a chainguide?

  • dangdang says:

    Can’t wait to get my feet on those new XT pedals! I was drooling over the XTR versions last year… but alas, I am not one to drop coin on XTR parts.

  • Ronnie says:

    I’m wondering why two piece calipers. That seems like a step backwards to me.

  • Greg says:

    The lever doesn’t change the spring tension.. it engages a friction damper which increases the force it takes to move the lower derailleur cage forward.

    On flat ground or on a hardtail this wouldn’t do anything to drivetrain drag, as it doesn’t increase the force on the chain, just stops it from flopping around. On a full suspension bike, the friction force would nominally resist the suspension compressing, and might add some drag when you shift to bigger cogs in the front or rear.

  • Brian Mullin says:

    Greg: I was trying to keep it simple, but I updated it to be more precise (hope that clears things up):

    “The system consists of spring with a one way friction pivot or ratchet gear, which is enclosed by a band clamp. The Off position moves the clamp upward away from the pivot, allowing free cage movement, and when the clamp is down, it tightens the pivot up, constricting movement or increasing friction in the forward direction. When engaged, this increased pivot friction, dampens the cage, quiets down chain noise, decreases chain slap, and helps alleviate any chain drop offs.”

  • Will T Smith says:

    Give me the 2×10 in 180mm and I’ll be all over it. It’s not the Hitori Honzo XTR crank, but XT has been super solid and it’s close enough.

  • nomef says:

    On the XTR rear derailleur pic, what kind of rear axle does the bike have? Is Shimano offering thru-axles?

  • alloycowboy says:

    Yay Shimano! By dropping the 44 tooth big ring and swapping the 9 cog cassette for a 10 cog cassette all you did was give us more redundant gears and with a reduced gear range.

  • woooosh says:

    yeah it looks great but why they change from allen key fixings? whats the thoughts behind this?,

    now we all to buy new tools to service our bikes. BS

  • Timi says:

    Worried about chain-slap then go grab an Alfine 11-speed SG700, they feel very good – tiny bit heavy an XC MTB. Been riding one on a lightweight aluminium frame for a month now and shifting is a dream.

  • herb neumann says:

    i think of the new rear deraileur like having a “pro pedal”‘ or a stablizing platform setting like we have on some suspension designs.

  • Jay says:

    Can you tell me if XT 10 speed cassette will be compatible to swap out my ultegra 6700 series 10 speed cassette (11×25). I sure can use all the help to ride hills in my neighborhood. Thanks for all your help…

  • Brian Mullin says:

    I would assume they are interchangeable?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*